Sujuk

pronounced: soo-juke
aka: sujuk, sucuk, soudjouk

a dry, spicy sausage made of ground beef specially seasoned and cured using old world recipes.


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Sahag's Sujuk (1/2 pound, whole)
Delivered deli fresh from Hollywood, CA

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Sahag's Sujuk (1 pound, whole)
Delivered deli fresh from Hollywood, CA

Basturma

pronounced: bah-stoor-mah
aka: pastirma, bastirma, pasterma, basterma

a wind-dried beef specially seasoned and cured using old world recipes.


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Sahag's Basturma (1/2 pound, sliced)
Delivered deli fresh from Hollywood, CA

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Sahag's Basturma (1 pound, sliced)
Delivered deli fresh from Hollywood, CA

What is sujuk?
Sujuk, also "sucuk" or soujouk is a dry, spicy sausage in Turkish, Bulgarian and Armenian cuisine eaten from the Balkans to the Middle East and Central Asia.

Sujuk consists of ground meat (usually beef, but pork is used in non-Muslim countries and horse meat in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan[1]), with various spices including cumin, sumac, garlic, salt, and red pepper, fed into a sausage casing and allowed to dry for several weeks. It can be more or less spicy; it is fairly salty and has a high fat content.
source: Wikipedia.org
How is sujuk eaten?
Sujuk may be eaten cooked (when raw, it is very hard and stiff). It is often cut into slices and cooked without additional oil, its own fat being sufficient to fry it. At breakfast, it is used in a way similar to bacon or spam. It is fried in a pan, often with eggs (e.g. as breakfast in Egypt), accompanied by a hot cup of sweet black tea. Sujuk is sometimes cooked with haricot bean or incorporated into pastries at some regions in Turkey. In Bulgaria, raw, sliced sujuk is often served as an appetizer with rakia or other high alcoholic drinks. In Lebanon, cooked sliced sujuk is made into sandwiches with garlic sauce and tomato.
source: Wikipedia.org